Spider Solitaire Classic Apps for IOS

Spider Solitaire Classic – “This is the classic game of spider solitaire, similar to the PC version.Portrait and landscape views supported, with the ability to lock the orientation (finally, you can lie on the couch without that annoying screen rotation!)” Price: Free iTunes Rating: 2.5/5 Spider Solitaire is one of the most popular versions of Solitaire, where you are tasked with placing all cards from each suit into descending sequences. In Spider Solitaire Classic you may play your way through 1 and 2 suit games, or when the time is right, up the difficulty to 4 suit games to truly challenge yourself. Play anywhere, any time, and for as long as you like. Spider Solitaire Classic is free, and will remain free. Don’t wait any longer, get your Solitaire on! Features: • Both Landscape and Portrait modes. • 1, 2, and 4 suit game modes. • Unlimited Undo • Customizable card backs • Tutorial • Statistics • Play in both Portrait and Landscape modes • Game saves, for quick pick-up and play • Play on both Tablet and Smartphone • Easy drag and drop interface If you liked Spider Solitaire Classic, try our other games: • Solitaire Classic • Spider Solitaire • BearBlitz • Sweep Those Mines! • Pocket Sudoku • Multiplayer War • Three Peaks Solitaire

Freecell Apps For IOS

FreeCell – “One of the enormously popular solitaire games included with Windows, FreeCell is a game that requires skill and patience to win! After dealing from a standard deck of 52 cards, use the four free cell spots as placeholders as you try and move all the cards to the Foundation stacks for a win. Unlike many solitaire games, all the cards in FreeCell can be seen at the opening deal, so most FreeCell deals can be solved, if you have what it takes!”

Price: $0.99 iTunes Rating: 3/5

Play one of the most popular games included with Windows, FreeCell, a solitaire game that requires skill, strategy and patience to win!

FreeCell adds a new element of strategy to the classic Klondike and Baker’s solitaire games. After dealing from a standard deck of 52 cards, use the four free cell spots as placeholders as you try to move all of the cards from the Foundation stacks for a win. Just like Klondike, you must move cards from the Tableau to the Foundation cells by suit, in ascending order. Most FreeCell deals can be solved, if you can find the right strategy.

FreeCell brings the classic FreeCell solitaire you loved from your Windows computer into the palm of your hand, with beautiful classic card faces. Play FreeCell anywhere, with a full suite of features designed just for the iPhone, iPod Touch and high definition play on the iPad.

If you played Mahjong or Klondike on Windows, you will love FreeCell solitaire for your mobile device!

FreeCell Features:

FreeCell Puzzle – Experience the unique gameplay of FreeCell solitaire, which enhances the beloved Klondike solitaire rule set with new elements of strategy. All cards in a game of FreeCell can be seen from the opening deal; it’s up to you to determine the best strategy. Four free cell spots open up even more chances for strategic play!

Drag or Tap Cards – Two control types for touch play makes FreeCell the definitive way to play. Forget clumsy mouse controls, and focus on the fun as you quickly move cards between cells in a solitaire blitz!

In-Depth Stat Tracking – Detailed statistics show games won, games lost, high score, longest win/loss streaks and much more. Prove you’re the ultimate FreeCell champion!

FreeCell has never been more fun! With two unique control schemes, randomized FreeCell puzzles, in-depth stat tracking, and social sharing features, FreeCell is the addictive card puzzle game you’ve been waiting for. You can play freecell online free if you use PC or laptop.

New solitaire players and fans of the classic mahjong and Klondike computer games alike will be addicted. Put your card playing and strategy skills to the test and download FreeCell today!

Solitaire Apps by Byterun for IOS

GameBox Solitaire – “GameBox Solitaire is our high quality card game pack including well-known card game. If you are familiar with Hardwood Solitaire, Solebon Solitaire or Top Ten Solitaire, then you will love this game!” Price: $2.99 iTunes Rating: 3.5/5 This app is designed for both iPhone and iPad  

  • Updated: Jun 10, 2016
  • Version: 6.3
  • Size: 47.4 MB
  • Language: English
  • Seller: Byterun, Ltd

Requires iOS 5.1.1 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.  

Solitaire by MobilityWare for IOS

Solitaire – “Drag and drop to move cards is supported as well as both portrait and landscape orientations, not all iPhone Solitaire apps support these desirable features. This is your classic game of Solitaire for the iPhone or iPod Touch. Also known as Klondike, this is the most popular version of Solitare. ” Price: $0.99 iTunes Rating: 4/5

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Solitaire

Requires iOS 6.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

  • Updated: Oct 26, 2015
  • Version: 4.6.0
  • Size: 30.7 MB
  • Languages: English, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Simplified Chinese

History of Freecell

How many times have you wanted to play a fun game with a friend from Scabble?. But you can not always have the partner, that’s why they invented the game which you can play alone. FreeCell is one of the variations of the classic with many interesting and more challenging for you .
freecell solitaire card game

The good news for players is that very few of the FreeCell games screen can not be solved . We just challenge your intellect and your sensitivity to the compound arrays . And you’ll play FreeCell with a deck of 52 standard trees .
The history of the game FreeCell is the most exciting thing. It was invented in 1978, but virtually unknown until it was released as one component on Windows 95.
One of the oldest ancestors of FreeCell is Eight Off. In the June 1968 edition of Scientific American, Martin Gardner described in his “Mathematical Games” column a game by C. L. Baker that is similar to FreeCell, except that cards on the tableau are built by suit rather than by alternate colors. Gardner wrote, “The game was taught to Baker by his father, who in turn learned it from an Englishman during the 1920s”.
This variant is now called Baker’s Game. FreeCell’s origins may date back even further to 1945 and a Scandinavian game called Napoleon in St. Helena (not the game Napoleon at St. Helena, also known as Forty Thieves).
 Paul Alfille changed Baker’s Game by making cards build according to alternate colors, thus creating FreeCell. He implemented the first computerised version of it in the TUTOR programming language for the PLATO educational computer system in 1978. Alfille was able to display easily recognizable graphical images of playing cards on the 512 × 512 monochrome display on the PLATO systems.
This original FreeCell environment allowed games with 4–10 columns and 1–10 cells in addition to the standard 8 × 4 game. For each variant, the program stored a ranked list of the players with the longest winning streaks. There was also a tournament system that allowed people to compete to win difficult hand-picked deals. Paul Alfille described this early FreeCell environment in more detail in an interview from 2000.

Egypt Pyramid Solitaire – Rules and Strategy

Nowadays, Solitaire Card Game is the most popular card game on the world. Pyramid Solitaire is so challenging card game that come from Acient Egypt. Play Pyramid Solitaire Games, you must help the Pharaoh build his illustrious pyramids by removing all the cards dealt at the start. Clear cards by selecting pairs of cards that add up to exactly 13.
There are some levels of Egypt Pyramid Solitaire Games you may select:
  • Pyramid Solitaire – Tradition
  • Pyramid Solitaire Easy
  • Pyramid Solitaire Relaxed
  • Pyramid Solitaire  Relaxed Easy
Solitaire Pyramid Egypt Card Games Online

1. Rule – How to play Pyramid Solitaire: 
Aces count as 1, Jacks count as 11 and Queens count as 12. Kings count as 13 and can be removed at any time by simply clicking on them. All other cards are at their face value. So for example you can combine an Ace and Queen to remove the pair, or Jack and a 2 to remove that pair.
To aid you, you may place a single card in the Temp Card Store. This will increase your pairing options by allowing you to get to otherwise impossible to reach cards that are in the pyramid. To successfully pass a round it is absolutely necessary for you to use this card store strategically and to do some planning and thinking with it!
Additionally the undo button will undo any single move, obviously that’s great for fixing minor errors but there is a little trick for pro players! The trick is to draw 3 additional cards to see if they will change the order of the cards that you will remove from the cards dealt at the top in the pyramid. If not, no harm done, just undo the move and continue matching the pairs of 13. Of course it helps that you can use this little trick any time it is convenient!
Pyramid Solitaire Ancient Egypt rewards excellent play and strategy. You receive bonus points for completing a level quickly, removing all cards in both the pyramid and the deck, and failing that for any remaining cards in the deck that you have not uncovered. The game is quite kind, in that there is always a bonus if you complete a round although of course better play, always means better bonuses!
2. Tips to play Pyramid Solitaire well
Although not easy to win Pyramid Solitaire, but there are some tips you can use:
– Always remove Kings as soon as possible, they literally just get in the way.
– Try to plan your moves. Look at the board and see what cards are blocking other cards.
– You absolutely must use the temporary card store. Combine that with planning and you can win most deals. Often simply by moving one card from the pyramid down to the store you can instantly uncover another card that you can use immediately.
– This almost a bit of a cheat. You can use the undo card to look at the next 3 cards coming. This will allow you to plan your moves more effectively.
– At the bottom where the groups of three cards a dealt, if you have too many cards the game will hide them to save space. Those cards are always there, just hidden!
– Remember you don’t have to remove every card, just the pyramid at the top.

Clock Patience Solitaire Card Game

1. Requirements/statistics:
Space: Moderate/Large
Level: Challenging
Cards: One standard 52-card deck or a computer with internet connected
Players: One
2. Layout
Shuffle the deck. Deal the cards; face down, into 13 piles of four cards each. The piles should be arranged to mimic the numbers on a clock, with an extra pile in the middle of the circle. The “numbers” of the piles (1 through 12 on the clock; the middle pair is 13) are important.
Clock patience solitaire game

It’s very easy if you play Clock Solitaire , because it has been put in right place and you just have to play.

3. Play
Turn the top card on the 13 pile face up (that’s the pile in the middle of the circle). Place it, still face up, under the pile of that card’s number.
For example, a card number 4, would go under the “4” pile. An Ace would go under pile “1”. Face cards are placed as follows: Jacks under 11, Queens under 12, Kings under 13.
Then, turn the top card on that pile face up and place it, still face up, under the appropriate pile. Continue in the manner until the game ends. If the final face-down card in a pile belongs to that same pile, continue the game by turning the next (moving clockwise) face-down card face up.
4. To win the game
In order to win all 13 piles must become face-up piles of four-of-a-kind.
However, you lose if the fourth King is turned face up before all the other sets are completed.

Freecell Solitaire card games

On the Solitaire Games, Freecell maybe is the most popular card game. Minions people all over the world play freecell but they don’t really know origin of Freecell they’re playing and who is created Freecell.
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  • The history of Freecell card game
FreeCell is a card game which is solved, in the majority of cases by strategy. It is played with one deck of cards – 52 cards in total which are all shown to the player throughout the game.
There are some types of Freecell Solitaire card games you can choose to play free online:
  • Freecell Green Felt
  • Eight off Solitaire – Freecell Type
  • Baker’s Game
  • Baker’s Game King Only
The game of FreeCell was created by Paul Alfille whilst he was a medical student, and is a variation of an earlier game called Baker’s Game. Alfille didn’t invent FreeCell on computer, he actually used cards to work out the game moves.
At the end of each game he commented that the cards ended up in suits, and it took quite a long time to shuffle them completely as he wasn’t very good at shuffling cards.
Alfille’s main objective in FreeCell was to know how the mathematics worked and the probabilities of achieving a perfect result.
He thought that he wanted to know how many games were winnable – and continues along the lines of – however there is a difference between the number of games which were winnable and the number of games which were actually won!
That of course, is a really interesting point. Just because there is a way of achieving a result, if the player doesn’t correctly process the information given by the cards, he may not win the game, although had he taken a different route an altogether alternative outcome may have been achieved.
The usual game of FreeCell has eight columns – however Alfille played around with variations giving between four and ten columns and between one and ten free cells. Every variant had its own ranking system for dedicated players whose objective was to get the longest winning streaks!

Spades

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Spades Rules

These are the rules I use for Spades. I got them from John McLeod’s pagat.com, which has rules for pretty much all card games. (C) John McLeod, 2011 – reprinted with permission.

The teams

The four players are in fixed partnerships, with partners sitting opposite each other. Deal and play are clockwise.

Rank of Cards

A standard pack of 52 cards is used. The cards, in each suit, rank from highest to lowest: A, K, Q, J, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2.

The Deal

The first dealer is chosen at random, and the turn to deal rotates clockwise. The cards are shuffled and then dealt singly, in clockwise order beginning with the player on dealer’s left, until all 52 cards have been dealt and everyone has 13.

The Bidding

In Spades, all four players bid a number of tricks. Each team adds together the bids of the two partners, and the total is the number of tricks that team must try to win in order to get a positive score. The bidding begins with the player to dealer’s left and continues clockwise around the table. Everyone must bid a number, and in theory any number from 0 to 13 is allowed. Unlike other games with bidding, there is no requirement for each bid to be higher than the last one, and players are not allowed to pass. There is no second round of bidding – bids once made cannot be altered.

Example: South deals; West bids 3; North bids 1; East bids 4; South bids 4. The objective of North and South is to win at least 5 ticks (4+1), East and West try to win at least 7 (4+3).

A bid of 0 tricks is known as Nil. This is a declaration that that the player who bid Nil will not win any tricks during the play. There is an extra bonus for this if it succeeds and a penalty if it fails. The partnership also has the objective of winning the number of tricks bid by the Nil’s partner. It is not possible to bid no tricks without bidding a Nil. If you don’t want to go for the Nil bonus or penalty you must bid at least 1.

The Play of the Hand

The player to dealer’s left leads any card except a spade to the first trick. Each player, in turn, clockwise, must follow suit if able; if unable to follow suit, the player may play any card.

A trick containing a spade is won by the highest spade played; if no spade is played, the trick is won by the highest card of the suit led. The winner of each trick leads to the next. Spades may not be led until either some player has played a spade (on the lead of another suit, of course), or the leader has nothing but spades left in hand.

Playing the first spade is known as “breaking” spades.

Scoring

A side that takes at least as many tricks as its bid calls for receives a score equal to 10 times its bid. Additional tricks (overtricks) are worth an extra one point each.

Sandbagging rule: Overtricks are colloquially known as bags. A side which (over several deals) accumulates ten or more bags has 100 points deducted from its score. Any bags beyond ten are carried over to the next cycle of ten overtricks – that is if they reached twenty overtricks they would lose another 100 points and so on.

Example: Suppose a team whose score is 337 bids 5 tricks and they have 7 bags carried over from the previous rounds. If they win 7 tricks they score 52, taking their score to 389 (and their bags to 9). If they win 8 tricks they score 53, but lose 100 because they now have 10 bags, and their score becomes 290 (337 + 53 – 100). If they win 9 tricks they score 54 and lose 100, bringing their score to 291.

If a side does not make its bid, they lose 10 points for each trick they bid.

If a bid of nil is successful, the nil bidder’s side receives 100 points. This is in addition to the score won (or lost) by the partner of the nil bidder for tricks made. If a bid of nil fails – that is, the bidder takes at least one trick – the bidder’s side loses 100 points, but still receives any amount scored for the partner’s bid.

When a nil fails, the tricks won by the nil bidder do not count towards making the partner’s bid, but do count as bags for the team.

The side which reaches 500 points first wins the game. If both sides reach 500 points in a single deal, the side with the higher score wins.

Spider Solitaire Rules

Objective

Spider Solitaire is a solitaire game where the objective is to order all the cards in descending runs from King down to Ace in the same suit. Once a run has been completed, for example King of clubs down to Ace of clubs, then the whole run will be removed from the table. Once the table is completely empty the game has been won.

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Setup

Spider Solitaire is played with two full decks, 104 cards. At the beginning 54 of the cards are divided between 10 tableaus, the first 4 tableaus have 6 cards each, the other 6 tableaus have 5 cards each. The top card of each tableau is turned face up, the others are face down. The remaining 50 cards are placed in a stock at the bottom of the screen.

Valid moves

A card can always be moved onto a card that is one higher in rank. You can for example move a 7 of clubs and put it on an 8 of clubs, or an 8 of hearts, diamonds or spades. However, even though you can move cards onto other cards in a different suit, the objective of the game is to create runs in the same suit, so a run will only be removed from the table if it’s all in the same suit, a full run in different suits doesn’t do anything for you. (Although it can be useful to move cards onto other suits just to get them out of the way).

You can move multiple cards together if they are all part of a run in the same suit. E.g. if you have 8 of clubs, 7 of clubs, 6 of clubs, then you can click the 8 and move them all together onto a 9 of any suit. However if you have 8 of clubs, 7 of hearts, 6 of diamonds, then you can’t move them all together, only the top card.

If a tableau is empty then any card or partial run is allowed to be moved onto it.

A full run does not have to be the only thing on a tableau to be removed. For example, a tableau might have three facedown cards and then a full run from King to Ace in the same suit and then the run would disappear, and the three facedown cards would remain.

Adding cards from the stock

When there are no more moves that can be made in the tableaus then you can click on the stock in the lower right corner. That will move 10 cards from the stock onto the tableaus, one card onto each tableau. Try not to do this until you are sure you have no other moves to make. It is required that there is at least one card in each tableau when the stock is clicked. If there is an empty tableau on the table you must first move one or more cards onto it before you can click on the stock.

Scoring

You start with 500 points. For each move you make one point gets subtracted. For each run you remove from the table you’ll get a 100 extra points. Example: if you’ve managed to make three full runs in 70 moves you’ll have 500-70+3*100 = 730 points.

Difficulty

The game can be played in three different modes, beginner, intermediate and advanced. In beginner mode there is only one suit (spades), in intermediate mode there are two (spades and hearts) and in advanced mode there are all four suits. There are the same number of cards, 104, in all modes